Tuesday, January 27, 2015

NPR blames feds for child abuse

NPR Radio reports this morning:
Laws intended to protect children from abuse and neglect are not being properly enforced, and the federal government is to blame. That's according to a study by the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which says children are suffering as a result.
This is left-wing NPR, so the whole purpose of the story is to trigger a feminine emotional response in favor of more government money and more power to official agencies to intervene in peoples' lives.

It does not matter if the facts show that child abuse is down and that CPS interventions do not do any good. As long as one child somewhere is suffering some abuse, then the do-gooders will advocate whatever useless action they can.
But there's broad agreement among those involved in child welfare that the system is in desperate need of repair, agencies are underfunded, and caseworkers are often overwhelmed.
No, there is no such agreement. From what I can see, the agencies have way too much money, and spend all their time investigating frivolous accusations.
Smith says state and local officials complain that they spend too much time filling out federal forms and trying to meet requirements that aren't necessarily best for kids.

Instead, he says, they want flexibility on how to spend federal funds so they can focus more on keeping families together, rather than on helping kids after they've been abused and removed from their homes.
Yeah, they always want more money, and no accountability.

Of all the NPR stories this morning, this was the only one to come preceded with a pre-story warning that it is unusually disturbing. Really? Is the typical NPR liberal commuting to work likely to run off the road at the thought of some social service agency not getting all the money it wants or having to fill out government forms?

1 comment:

paulmurray said...

"Instead, he says, they want flexibility on how to spend federal funds so they can focus more on keeping families together, rather than on helping kids after they've been abused and removed from their homes."

So … they don't want to have to wait until the kids are abused and removed. IOW, they want to insert themselves into the family home *before* there is abuse, *before* kids "need" to be removed.

And how are they going to choose which homes get the friendly assistance of the child protection agencies before they do anything actionable? Or do these agencies simply want to monitor and manage everyone?